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Major-General George de Lacy Evans, G.C.B., D.C.L.
7th October 1787-9th January 1870

Born in Ireland, he initially joined the East India Company army and transferred to the British Army in 1806. He served with the 3rd Light Dragoons in the Peninsular War and was in North America for the end of the War of 1812.

At Waterloo as Major, he was attached to the 2nd "Union" Cavalry Brigade as an additional aide-de-camp to Sir William Ponsonby. It is said that Evans actually ordered the charge of the brigade as Ponsonby was off his horse at the time. The charge succeeded in its primary aim but they failed to rally in time and lost severely in the French counter-attack. Ponsonby was killed and Evans only escaped because of the power and stamina of his horse. It was Evans' job to reform what was left of the brigade.

Evans served as commander of the British Auxiliary Legion in Spain (1835-37) and as commander of the 2nd Division in the Crimea. He became ill after the Alma and returned home.

He was considered a courageous and intelligent officer and had a high concern for the welfare of his men. As an MP after 1815 he advocated Radical policies.

His brother, Richard Lacy Evans (1782-1848) is also commemorated on the same tomb. He was an officer in the Madras Army, one of the three presidency armies of the East India Company.

The tomb is large, stands with space around it, very close to the central avenue and main chapel. These were all signs of considerable wealth and status.

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Tomb of George de Lacy Evans
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