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Field Marshal Sir Alexander George Woodford, GCB, KCMG
15 June 1782 – 26 August 1870

Coldstream Guards from 28/12/1799.
Copenhagen 1807
Siege of Cádiz 1811
Peninsular War 1811-1814
He commanded the 2nd battalion of the Coldstream Guards at the Battle of Quatre Bras, the Battle of Waterloo (where he commanded the garrison in Hougoumont) and the storming of Cambrai all in June 1815.
He was promoted to Field Marshal on 1 January 1868.
He was made Governor of the Royal Hospital Chelsea in August 1868 and died there two years later.

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Grave of Field Marshal Sir Alexander Woodford
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Lieutenant-General Sir John William Waters KCB
1774 – 21 November 1842

As a Captain he was an exploring officer during the Corunna Campaign and bought from the Spanish a despatch from Berthier to Soult that they had captured. This caused Sir John Moore to change his plans and withdraw.
After this he was promoted Major and attached to the Portuguese Army with the local rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.
Wellington wrote of him:
He has made himself extremely useful to the British army by his  knowledge of the languages of Spain and Portugal, by his intelligence  and activity. I have employed him in several important affairs, which he  has always transacted in a manner satisfactory to me; and his knowledge  of the language and customs of the country has induced me to send him  generally with the patrols employed to ascertain the position of the  enemy, in which services he has acquitted himself most ably.
Attached to Wellington's staff it was Waters that discovered the skiff and barges that enabled the Douro to be crossed, totally surprising the French.
Waters was taken prisoner in April 1811 while scouting. A few days later he escaped, his horse was faster than those of his escorts.
Shortly after this Wellington appointed him an assistant  adjutant-general, and on 30 May 1811 he was made brevet lieutenant-colonel.
He served throughout the Peninsular War.
He was wounded at Waterloo where he took up the role of adjutant-general after Sir Edward Barnes was wounded.

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Tomb of Lt-General John William Waters
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Major-General Marcus Antonius Waters
6 November 1793 – 14 January 1868

Joined the Royal Engineers in 1809.
Served in the Peninsular War 1812-1814.
Was at Quatre Bras and Waterloo 1815.
Retired 1855.
Last surviving RE officer present at Waterloo.

His son, also called Marcus Antonius (1827? - 14th May 1896), was a Captain in the 77th and is buried near him.

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Tomb of Major-General Marcus Antonius Waters
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